Code by Brennon Brimhall

About

Brennon is a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University and works as a software engineer.

While in high school, Brennon discovered FRC and joined Team 20. While he was on the team, the Rocketeers won four regional events, received seven regional team awards, and qualified for the Indiana Robotics Invitational twice. Brennon’s leadership in the areas of programming, strategy, and scouting was instrumental in helping the team achieve this recognition.

Upon graduating high school, Brennon began two years of full-time, unpaid volunteer service as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Much of his time was spent in the southern Denver metropolitan area. As a missionary, Brennon’s responsibilities included serving local community members, supporting local church programs, and training other missionaries.

After Brennon returned from his mission and began studying at Brigham Young University, he found that there were few teams in the area. In the summer of 2017, Brennon and other FIRST alumni began to lay the foundation of the Utah Valley STEM Foundation and the Provotypes, a community FRC team for high school students in the Utah Valley. At the 2018 Utah Regional, the Provotypes were awarded the Rookie All-Star Award, the event’s highest honor for a new team. At the 2018 Houston Championship, the Provotypes ranked thirteenth and were awarded the Highest Rookie Seed Award for their division. At the 2019 Utah Regional, the Provotypes were picked third overall and advanced to the regional semifinals. Brennon resigned from serving as a board member on the Utah Valley STEM Foundation and as the lead mentor for the Provotypes in November 2019 to focus on his undergraduate research and honors thesis.

Brennon graduated cum laude and with University Honors from Brigham Young University in Computer Science. His undergraduate thesis explored using machine learning for effective Parkinson’s Disease diagnosis. As a student, he worked as an assistant computational scientist for BYU’s Office of Research Computing, the arm of the university that enables high-performance computational research.

A list of Brennon’s other written works is available here.